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Teacher Labor Markets & Teacher Policy « Center on Educational Governance (CEG)

Teacher Labor Markets & Teacher Policy

Teacher Labor Markets & Teacher Policy Overview

Extant research has shown that teachers are the single most important resource in a child’s education. However, research also shows that teachers are distributed inequitably among districts and schools; many of the highest-need students have no access to some of the best teachers. At CEG, we have undertaken research projects that intend to inform the strategies districts use to attract and retain teachers in hard-to-staff schools. Our work in this area focuses on district compensation policies that may impact teacher recruitment, retention and distribution. Our research involves public schools that are part of the district system, as well as charter schools and charter management organizations that have enhanced decision-making authority to develop innovative ways to attract and retain highly effective teachers.

CEG research examines the strategies that school districts, charter schools and charter management organizations use to attract and retain teachers in hard-to-staff schools. Our work in this area utilizes both quantitative and qualitative research methods.

Books and Book Chapters

Strunk, K.O. (2010). “The Economics of Teachers’ Unions in the United States,” in Brewer, D.J. & McEwan, P.J. (Eds.) Economics of Education. Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Strunk, K.O. (2010). “The Economics of Teachers’ Unions in the United States,” in Baker, E., McGaw, B. & Peterson, P. Barry McGaw, Penelope Peterson and Eva Baker (Eds). The International Encyclopedia of Education, 3rd Edition.  Amsterdam: Elsevier.


Journal Articles     

Strunk, K.O. (online to be published). Policy poison or promise: exploring the dual nature of California school district collective bargaining agreements. Education Administration Quarterly, xx(x) p. 1-42

Kolbe, T., & Strunk, K.O. (online to be published). Economic incentives as a strategy for responding to teacher staffing problems: a typology of policies and practices. Education Administration Quarterly,  xx(x) p.1-35

Strunk, K.O. & Zeehandelaar, D. (2011). Differentiated compensation: How California school districts use economic incentives to target teachers. Journal of Education Finance, 36(3), p. 268-293.

Strunk, K.O. (2011). Are teachers’ unions really to blame? Collective bargaining agreements and their relationships with district resource allocation and student performance in California. Education Finance and Policy,6(3), p. 354-398.

Strunk, K.O. & Reardon, S.F. (2010).  “Measuring the strength of teachers’ unions: An empirical application of the partial independence item response approach.” Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, 35(6), 629-670..

Strunk, K.O. & Grissom, J.A. (2010). “Do strong unions shape district policies? Collective bargaining, teacher contract restrictiveness, and the political power of teachers’ unions.” Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 32(3), 389-406.

Loeb, S., Miller, L. & Strunk, K.O. (2009). “The State Role in Teacher Professional Development and Education throughout Teachers’ Careers,” Education Finance and Policy, 4(2), 212-228.

Loeb, S., Miller, L. & Strunk, K.O. (2009). “The State Role in Teacher Compensation,” Education Finance and Policy, 4(1), 89-114.

Strunk, K.O. & Robinson, J. (2006). “Oh, Won’t You Stay?: A Multi-Level HGLM Analysis of Teacher Attrition,” Peabody Journal of Education, 81(4), 65-94.


Other Publications

Strunk, K.O. (2009). “California Teachers’ Union Contracts and Negotiations: Moving Beyond the Stereotype.” PACE Policy Brief.

Address

Center on Educational Governance
Rossier School of Education
University of Southern California
3470 Trousdale Parkway
Waite Phillips Hall, Room 901
Los Angeles, CA 90089-4039

Phone: (213) 740-0697
Fax: (213) 740-4184
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